Category: Learn

  • I’m not that good.

    For some reason I generally am able to go along feeling like I do a reasonable job at the things I choose to do ‘professionally’. I am dedicated and self-reflective and I get feedback that tells me that what I am doing is working for the people I work with.

    And then I will hit one of my edges. I will be doing something and realize that it really isn’t going that well. It is very uncomfortable. I don’t like how it feels. It is tempting to avoid even thinking about it, or to write it off as a bad day or even to convince myself that ‘someone else’ is responsible.

    Well those are some of the ways I used to respond.

    Now I like to sit with it and accept that I am having this experience. I didn’t do that well. That’s how it is. It wasn’t on purpose. I wanted to do well. I just wasn’t ready to do well. Once I have settled with my ‘failure’ I move onto the important question. Why?

    Why did this happen? What did I do differently? What is being presented here that is outside of my current experience? What is this triggering for me? How might I respond differently? What would I like to do in this situation next time?

    For me avoiding these questions leads to bigger heartache. If I can embrace that sometimes I am not that good then I can use these moments as a platform to learn.

    Luke

    Artist, advisor, coach.
    I find the real problem, make the difficult easy
    and tell a great story.

    Check out more stories in the category: How to Human, Learn

  • You’ve got to back yourself.

    A few years ago a I was talking about a big project I was trying to make happen with a friend of mine and they said to me:

    “You’ve got to back yourself”.

    It was very useful to hear the obvious stated. If I am not standing 100% behind my own idea then what chance does it have?

    Yesterday I was talking with another friend about making art. I was at risk of going down a black hole of uncertainty and they said:

    “Don’t do that to yourself. You have to stand behind whatever it is that’s interesting to you and say ‘that’s my thing.’”

    Friends are awesome.

    Luke

    Check out more stories in the category: How to Human, Learn

  • Significance.

    Someone once told me that they had a history teacher who said that there are 3 things we can do when we write about history.

    The first is to recall the facts. The second is to outline what these facts mean. These two steps are where most people stop, The theory goes that it is the next step that really makes the difference. The third thing that a writer can do is to explain the significance of this event.

    I find that when I am planning just about any communication I get a better result if I ask myself “what is the significance of this thing for this group of people?”

    By answering this question I think of the exchange from their perspective. This makes what I say much sharper, more relevant and more likely to inspire action.

    Luke

    Check out more stories in the category: How to Human, Knowledge Bank, Learn

  • Unraveling.

    When I change something about the way I move, when I clarify how a particular joint or movement pathway works, I always expect that the immediate result will be clarity. In the end it is. Things become smoother and require less effort.

    But in the short term things are less predictable. Sometimes it is immediate improvement but other times things get discombobulated. Changing one thing can have a knock on effect, there can be an unraveling of other movement pathways that I didn’t even know were related to the first one I changed. Or I can feel out of sorts and confused.

    Confusion is an important step in creating change. I try to embrace this and enjoy the uncertainty.

    Eventually things will sort themselves out.

    Luke

    Check out more stories in the category: How to Human, Learn

  • How easy could this be?

    I have a funny habit of equating ‘hard to do’ with ‘doing a good job’.

    What this means is that when I care about something I find myself using lots of unnecessary energy and grinding my way through it rather than using the amount of effort needed to do this thing.

    So I ask myself ‘how easy could this be?’ and then (mostly) dial down the amount of energy I’m expending to get something done. Looking frantic doesn’t make me any more effective, quite the opposite.

    When I make it easy I move easily through the task. It becomes effortless and more effective.

    Luke

     

    Artist, advisor, coach.
    I find the real problem, make the difficult easy
    and tell a great story.

    Check out more stories in the category: How to Human, Learn